Lack of nurse educators = lack of nurses in the field

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Avatar of Mi-chan Mi-chan 6 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #272187
    Avatar of MissDarina
    MissDarina
    Participant

    I have seen a lot of commercials sponsored by Johnson and Johnson advertising the importance of having nurse educators. A thought came to mind, “They must really be desperate or in need of nurse educators”. The conundrum is this: Nurses with a Masters or PhDs are not getting adequate compensation at these colleges, universities, etc. They would rather work in the field (hospitals, clinics, private practice, drug companies, nursing homes, home health agencies, etc) and make upwards of $80,000 or more as opposed to the typical $65,000 from teaching. The only draw to teach would be if the nurse really had a passion for teaching, right? I’m assuming those come few and far between…correct?

    I have spoken to many nurses who have indicated that they would never go into teaching for nursing schools just because the pay is not so good. The students and the patients are the ones that are greatly affected by this.

    Just wanted to vent…

    #272200
    Avatar of souljourner
    souljourner
    Participant

    Very true. I posted on this topic in the past. The problem is only going to get worse. Nurses aren’t willing to go into teaching because they make so much more in nursing. Colleges and universities aren’t even requiring their nursing instructors to have a bachelors or masters anymore as long as they are willing to teach. The colleges nowadays are willing to overlook their degree requirements. Still, there aren’t enough nurses who are willing to go into teaching/training future nurses.

    [i]Originally posted by MissDarina[/i]
    I have seen a lot of commercials sponsored by Johnson and Johnson advertising the importance of having nurse educators. A thought came to mind, “They must really be desperate or in need of nurse educators”. The conundrum is this: Nurses with a Masters or PhDs are not getting adequate compensation at these colleges, universities, etc. They would rather work in the field (hospitals, clinics, private practice, drug companies, nursing homes, home health agencies, etc) and make upwards of $80,000 or more as opposed to the typical $65,000 from teaching. The only draw to teach would be if the nurse really had a passion for teaching, right? I’m assuming those come few and far between…correct?

    I have spoken to many nurses who have indicated that they would never go into teaching for nursing schools just because the pay is not so good. The students and the patients are the ones that are greatly affected by this.

    Just wanted to vent…

    #272211
    Avatar of kompheak03
    kompheak03
    Participant

    Yes you are right and this is also why getting into the nursing program is very difficult.

    [i]Originally posted by MissDarina[/i]
    I have seen a lot of commercials sponsored by Johnson and Johnson advertising the importance of having nurse educators. A thought came to mind, “They must really be desperate or in need of nurse educators”. The conundrum is this: Nurses with a Masters or PhDs are not getting adequate compensation at these colleges, universities, etc. They would rather work in the field (hospitals, clinics, private practice, drug companies, nursing homes, home health agencies, etc) and make upwards of $80,000 or more as opposed to the typical $65,000 from teaching. The only draw to teach would be if the nurse really had a passion for teaching, right? I’m assuming those come few and far between…correct?

    I have spoken to many nurses who have indicated that they would never go into teaching for nursing schools just because the pay is not so good. The students and the patients are the ones that are greatly affected by this.

    Just wanted to vent…

    #272223
    Avatar of kmygrl213
    kmygrl213
    Participant

    [i]Originally posted by kompheak03[/i]
    Yes you are right and this is also why getting into the nursing program is very difficult.

    Its difficult because the FLIPs (pinoys) have a monopoly on that industry!

    #272235
    Avatar of cc7tnk
    cc7tnk
    Participant

    Call me gay but I want to be a nurse! That’s the best job ever, I would be working with females all day! What more can I want!

    #272246
    Avatar of MissDarina
    MissDarina
    Participant

    [i]Originally posted by cc7tnk[/i]
    Call me gay but I want to be a nurse! That’s the best job ever, I would be working with females all day! What more can I want!

    That and the feeling that you’re helping other people. Plus, the starting salary and sign-on bonuses are bad either! :)

    #272257
    Avatar of Guneesh
    Guneesh
    Participant

    I’m guilty too. I want to be a nurse, but not a Nursing instructor.

    It’s not the nurses fault, the pay just sucks. But like you said you really need to have a passion in teaching to give up being a nurse (making more money)

    My understanding is that when people go into nursing is either A) they want to care for people and B) make good money

    I haven’t met one person who went into nursing thinking of wanting to become a teacher.

    [i]Originally posted by MissDarina[/i]
    I have seen a lot of commercials sponsored by Johnson and Johnson advertising the importance of having nurse educators. A thought came to mind, “They must really be desperate or in need of nurse educators”. The conundrum is this: Nurses with a Masters or PhDs are not getting adequate compensation at these colleges, universities, etc. They would rather work in the field (hospitals, clinics, private practice, drug companies, nursing homes, home health agencies, etc) and make upwards of $80,000 or more as opposed to the typical $65,000 from teaching. The only draw to teach would be if the nurse really had a passion for teaching, right? I’m assuming those come few and far between…correct?

    I have spoken to many nurses who have indicated that they would never go into teaching for nursing schools just because the pay is not so good. The students and the patients are the ones that are greatly affected by this.

    Just wanted to vent…

    #272271
    Avatar of baromboran
    baromboran
    Participant

    all the nurses that i’ve met near where i work are working in the inner city in local health clinics making less than i am as a school teacher. yet, they put in more hours than i do because that is the only way the clinic is to stay open and free to the community. i know a few other nurses in afrika who are living to assist some of the most oppressed communities without pay. these nurses went through the same formal education, and i’m sure some of them will be come teachers and/or professors in the future. perhaps such folk will transform the students’ value of money into the value of human life and self-sacrifice in order to influence personal and social change one can bring forth using one’s profound ability to nurse back to health marginalized communities here and abroad.

    [i]Originally posted by MissDarina[/i]
    I have seen a lot of commercials sponsored by Johnson and Johnson advertising the importance of having nurse educators. A thought came to mind, “They must really be desperate or in need of nurse educators”. The conundrum is this: Nurses with a Masters or PhDs are not getting adequate compensation at these colleges, universities, etc. They would rather work in the field (hospitals, clinics, private practice, drug companies, nursing homes, home health agencies, etc) and make upwards of $80,000 or more as opposed to the typical $65,000 from teaching. The only draw to teach would be if the nurse really had a passion for teaching, right? I’m assuming those come few and far between…correct?

    I have spoken to many nurses who have indicated that they would never go into teaching for nursing schools just because the pay is not so good. The students and the patients are the ones that are greatly affected by this.

    Just wanted to vent…

    #272282
    Avatar of MissDarina
    MissDarina
    Participant

    [i]Originally posted by baromboran[/i]

    all the nurses that i’ve met near where i work are working in the inner city in local health clinics making less than i am as a school teacher. yet, they put in more hours than i do because that is the only way the clinic is to stay open and free to the community. i know a few other nurses in afrika who are living to assist some of the most oppressed communities without pay. these nurses went through the same formal education, and i’m sure some of them will be come teachers and/or professors in the future. perhaps such folk will transform the students’ value of money into the value of human life and self-sacrifice in order to influence personal and social change one can bring forth using one’s profound ability to nurse back to health marginalized communities here and abroad.

    [quote]
    [i]Originally posted by MissDarina[/i]
    I have seen a lot of commercials sponsored by Johnson and Johnson advertising the importance of having nurse educators. A thought came to mind, “They must really be desperate or in need of nurse educators”. The conundrum is this: Nurses with a Masters or PhDs are not getting adequate compensation at these colleges, universities, etc. They would rather work in the field (hospitals, clinics, private practice, drug companies, nursing homes, home health agencies, etc) and make upwards of $80,000 or more as opposed to the typical $65,000 from teaching. The only draw to teach would be if the nurse really had a passion for teaching, right? I’m assuming those come few and far between…correct?

    I have spoken to many nurses who have indicated that they would never go into teaching for nursing schools just because the pay is not so good. The students and the patients are the ones that are greatly affected by this.

    Just wanted to vent…

    [/quote]

    this is my hope as well.

    #272293
    Avatar of Mi-chan
    Mi-chan
    Participant

    [i]Originally posted by Guneesh[/i]
    My understanding is that when people go into nursing is either A) they want to care for people and B) make good money

    i know few people who go into nursing for money… the ones that do, mainly strive to become CRNAs (nurse anesthesists). the journey to get there definitely is not easy, since its a very competitive field. for those who are pursuing for money, i discourage it because you will seriously get burnt out and overwhelmed if you do not have a passion for it!

    otherwise, i would highly recommend it to people who sincerely want to help people.=)

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